Tag Archives: Backpacking

Camping at Veda Lake 02 & 03 September, 2018

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Camping at Veda Lake 02 & 03 September, 2018

Sunday, 02-Sept-2018 through Monday, 03-Sept-2018

 

It’s labor day weekend, and we’re not planning on laboring particularly hard.  In fact, our goal is to basically labor not at all.  The car’s going to do the bulk of the laboring.
Specifically, we’re going backpacking!  Sarah’s first post-surgery backpacking trip!  Woo!
It’s a trial run, though, not a full-on trip.  More of a “see how our legs feel, and make sure all the gear still works” kind of trip, instead of a “let’s work ourselves and be exhausted by the end of it” sort of trip.
With that in mind, Sarah was careful about which hike to pick… and found what was absolutely the perfect destination for us: a place called Veda Lake.  It’s a small lake South of Mt. Hood, about a mile away from the trailhead.  The challenge, though, is getting to the trailhead itself – it’s 30min down an extremely rough road – rough enough that the trip reports all warned us that we’d need a tough vehicle and even tougher nerves to make it up.
Sunday
Thankfully, we’re tough cookies, and the Subaru is just as tough a car as we are cookies.  We made it up without any trouble, and found a beautifully empty parking lot waiting for us.  There were cars there, true, but not nearly as many as we’d seen on the drive in – and since it was labor day that was a rather major blessing for us.
The hike in?  It went quickly and easily.
I mean, come on.  It was barely over a mile – we’re out of shape, but thankfully not that far out of shape.  I’ve been working out a fair bit, and Sarah’s been doing a ton of PT, so the hike was pretty clean for us.  The only challenges arose from my backpack – this was the first time I’d taken it out for a real backpacking trip, and it’s definitely a bit different than the one I’ve gotten used to.  I… hesitate to admit to the sheer number of curses I uttered as I was packing it and trying to get it comfortable, but that’s how it goes with a new pack, right?
We walked in, past a few groups walking out, and even passing one going in!  Don’t let that fool you though, the only reason we were able to pass them was because they were a huge team – three humans, four dogs, and one kayak.  Not one of the light ones either… one of those heavy wal-mart kayaks.  They… they were making some life decisions that day.
Anyways, we ended up being thankful for that Kayak, because it slowed the other team down long enough for Sarah, Ollie and I to get one of the best campsites on the lake.  It wasn’t right on the water, but it had a nice fallen tree to eat dinner by, and enough room for us to set up the tent on perfectly level ground beautifully devoid of any roots or rocks.  It was lovely, and we had camp set up quickly enough that we were able to spend some time exploring the lake and playing around in the water before dinner.
One strange thing we found?  Spears.  As in, wooden sticks that had been sharpened, and stabbed into a dead tree in our campsite.  Not in a creepy way, though.  I know that description sounds “children of the forest hunting for your face-meat”, but it was more “some young kids sharpened sticks and threw them at a tree because it’s fun” sort of thing.  So clearly Sarah and I had a spear-throwing competition in the middle of the woods.  I can’t remember who won, but I can promise that Sarah and I both enjoyed ourselves thoroughly.
Dinner?  Simple stuff this time – just mountain house freeze-dried meals and some whiskey and tea.  It was a practice run, remember, so we wanted to go light and simple.  No back country cooking cuisine this time, I’m afraid.  But hey – that’s fine.  We enjoyed ourselves immensely!  Just being outside, watching the sun set and then watching the stars come out… it was beautiful, and an amazing chance to enjoy spending time with each other.
Evening
Random challenge that I didn’t expect to run into?  Getting Ollie to come to bed.  When we camp, Ollie usually runs right into the tent… but for some reason she was on full sentry-duty this time, insistent on guarding the campsite all evening.  She was good, and came when we called her, but she wasn’t super happy about it.  She’d even made a little nest for herself under one of the trees nearby, so that she could overlook the camp and keep watch… cute!
Monday
Monday dawned bright and early – it was perfect, and we were even able to wake up quietly and pleasantly, since Ollie was nicely tired from the day before and wasn’t quite into full spaz mode just yet.  Getting to bed early definitely helped too; we were up and mobile early, having breakfast and enjoying seeing the sun rising over the mountains around us.
Quick side note?  Starbucks instant lattes are delicious… when they’re fresh.  Turns out, they do go bad.  Not like “make you sick” bad, but… definitely less than optimal.
We played around in the lake a little bit, but honestly… it was cold, yo.  Veda Lake is in a depression, with pretty steep hills all around it, so we didn’t get any direct sunlight until we had already packed up and were heading out, sometime around 9:30 or 10:00.
We’d planned on staying most of the day; swimming and catching crawfish and enjoying the solitude of the lake, but that didn’t quite work… so instead we aimed to head back into town early and enjoy the chance to rest, relax, and make a fancy dinner.
Packing went well, hiking went well… the walk out was honestly really pleasant.  The sun had already risen, so it was that perfect kind of weather where it’s warm, but not hot quite yet.  Cool enough that we enjoyed the walking, but not so cold that we wanted to put jackets on.
Ollie, of course, loved the whole event – sprinting forward and backwards, jumping over logs, and sending out the kind of happy energy that makes you wish that you could just run screaming through the woods for hours at a time.  You know, like I did when I was younger and somehow even less sane than I currently am?  Yeah, just like that.
It was a good trip.
**Last side note: Ollie doesn’t like sitting up front at first.  She’s always cranky about coming up, instead of just hanging out in the back seat.  But the problem is that she gets bored in the back seat, and barks at everything that looks interesting as we drive.  Once we drag her into the front seat, she remembers how fun it is to stick your head out the window!**

Winter Camping on Mt. St. Helens

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Thursday and Friday, 07 & 08-Dec, 2017

 

It’s been a while since I’ve gone backpacking.

Busy work, not knowing much about trails in the Northwest, and a broken leg kind of contributed to that… but still.  No excuses.

 

It’s also been a while since I’ve attempted a summit out here… see the previously mentioned reasons.

 

It’s been way too long.  Sarah agreed.  Ollie agreed.  I think.  She might have just been hungry.  Either way, the three of us all agreed, packed up our gear, and took a drive out to Mount Saint Helens.

We had been talking about hiking up St. Helens for a while at this point, but never had the chance to do it; Not only is the mountain very committing (12 miles, with 5700+ ft of elevation gain), but we also have to contend with snow conditions, since the main route is prone to avalanche in some conditions.

 

 

 

 

We prepped the day before, packing and coordinating tons of gear between Sarah, Ollie and myself.  And by that, I mean that Sarah took a significant portion of the gear, while I stayed light and easy.  I mean, I didn’t slouch too much… mine was ~30 lbs, while hers was ~37 lbs, but still.  Those seven pounds don’t seem like a lot until your a few hours into it, and your legs don’t want to move.

 

We actually got into it on Thursday, driving up into Washington and getting our permits – not only a sno-park permit, but also the tree cutting permit!  Did I mention that?  We had an ancillary goal to this hike; we’d learned that you can legally harvest Christmas trees nearby, so after the hike planned on tracking down our own lovely tree!

The process was a bit more complex, of course.  So three stops and an internet search later, we gave up and just bought the permit online before driving into the national park.

 

Walking in was glorious.

Like I mentioned, it had been a while since we’d gone backpacking.  Just the simple act of walking uphill, carrying a pack, over the snow, with the looming mountain above us, was enough to send us into giggles.  We had a blast – stopping every so often to rest and enjoy the view, watching Ollie blast in and out of the tree line, and just enjoying the crisp air and warm sun.

And it was warm – almost unseasonably so, actually.  Sarah called it “summer conditions”, and it did worry us a little.  The warmer it gets, the softer the snow becomes… which might not seem like the worst thing.  But it means more slipping, and more effort to get the same amount of elevation.  At our elevation it wasn’t a major concern, but for our ascent the next day… well, we made sure to keep an eye on conditions.

We finally broke out of the tree line in the early afternoon, a fair bit ahead of the schedule we’d set for ourselves.  Which meant that we had even more time to set camp than expected… which meant that Sarah had time to construct what was undoubtedly the most impressive campsite I’ve ever seen.  A huge platform was excavated from the snow, leveled out and tamped down, with a windbreaker wall built up around the edges.  This thing even had steps leading into the tent.  Seriously, you don’t even know.

And I helped!  By boiling water.  And staying out of the way.  Turns out, snow skills are valuable when camping on snow.  Who knew?

Well, Sarah knew.  I learned quickly, after seeing how excellent the tent site became.

What we didn’t know, was quite how quickly fuel burns up at that elevation and temperature.  Sure, it was warm… but that’s when you’re walking with a pack.  The stove wasn’t walking… and was half-buried in the snow for stability.  Which led to a quite fast burn rate… which led to an empty canister.

We’d run out of fuel – dinner was made, thankfully, though we hadn’t had enough fuel to really boil as much water as we’d planned.  We ate and discussed, coming to two conclusions:

One, that we wished we had hot cocoa.

Two, that we probably had enough water to summit, but it’d be close.

Our plan was simple – start hiking early in the morning, and check in with our water supplies every two hours.  If we ran too low, we’d immediately turn around, ensuring that we had enough water for a well-hydrated return hike.  Not the ideal conditions, but that’s part of adventure, right?  Adapting, and making intelligent and informed decisions.

Our decision and plan made, we headed to bed.  At 5:40 in the afternoon.  It was dark and we were tired.  And we’d be starting in early in the morning…

 

In the morning, we really regretted running out of fuel.  Instant coffee is made to be reconstituted in hot water.  Not cold water.  When you pour it into cold water, you get a gross caffeine paste that wakes you up… half from the caffeine, and half from just how vile it tastes.  We both learned this the hard way, gulping down what we could before packing up and heading onward, breakfast bars in our hands and crampons on our feet.

Note: Sunrise over mountains is ridiculously, incredibly, unbelievably beautiful.  Just FYI.

We’re feeling good, having gotten moving a little bit before dawn, sometime around 5:30 or so.  It’s not until around 10:00 when we’re resting before the final push that our water situation started to get a bit grim, and we had to have the hard decision about whether to push onward or turn around.

In all honesty, we were’t super close to the summit – it was still maybe an hour to go ahead of us.  And that hour or two would have been rough, thanks to the warm weather and significant elevation gain.  In the end, it was a pretty quick conversation before we decided that discretion was the better part of valor, and headed back the way we came.

Descending was much quicker than ascending, thankfully, and a lot less draining on the water supplies.  I even did a bit of glissading (Editors note: That’s when you slide down the mountain on your butt.  Don’t worry, Ben had snow pants on) for the first time since my injury, which was super fun!  Ollie didn’t think so at first, though, and kept trying to catch me and stop me from falling… cute, but also scary since her way of stopping someone is to chomp on their jacket while bracing herself.  After that it was pretty flat anyways though, so we all walked the rest of the way back to camp without incident, continuing to massively enjoy the views as the sun finished illuminating the range around us.

 

 

Once we hit camp, we quickly packed up and headed out.

Wait, that sounds wrong.

Ohh right!  What I meant to say was, we bonked out and took a nap.  My mistake, those two things are so similar, amirite?

After our luxurious nap we pack up again (with Sarah again taking the lions share of the gear.  Thank you!) and start out on the rest of the hike.  It wasn’t short, I’ll admit to that… it seemed to drag on forever, even with the cool views and cool air, but thankfully the path was pretty clear and simple, so the snow didn’t slow us down too much.  It did get a little icy near the end, but nothing necessitating putting the crampons back on, thankfully.

The most excitement of the walk out, aside from dreaming of the snacks we’d left in the car for ourselves, was watching Ollie zip around.  She’d been pretty tuckered out for most of the hike down, but once we got back into treeline she perked right up, and started blasting around like normal.  Which was a bit annoying, since she lost a puppy-boot at one point.  Which, of course, caused us to stop for 20min while we searched her tracks to find the lost shoe.  Bluh.

 

Back at the car, we rested and recharged.  We’d stashed some brisket sandwiches and water for ourselves, and so were well fed and happy after a short break – ready to head off and find our tree!

Funny story though… the forest is pretty big.  I mean, we had a specific zone that we were supposed to harvest from… but that doesn’t narrow it down too much, when that zone is a few hundred acres.  Thankfully, we’d been given a bit of a tip from a ranger we’d run into, and had a pretty good idea that we’d find something good on a specific stretch of backwoods highway.

A stretch that just so happened to pass a really nice overlook of Mt. St. Helens, by the way… an overlook that we drove past just at sunset.  So clearly we stopped for a romantic sunset picnic of more snacks.

After our quick stop, it wasn’t much of a drive to the secret tree spot that we’d learned about.  We weren’t sure we’d recognize it when we got there…. but ohh man were we wrong.  We made a turn, and suddenly a massive forest of Christmas trees opened up in front of us, with giant pine trees towering at least 150ft above them.  It looked like ants walking around the feet of giants… all of which would make glorious trees for our livingroom!

It took a bit of doing, but we finally found the perfect one.  We wanted a tree that spoke to both of us – not something we were okay with, but something that we both knew was right.  Silly, but hush I don’t care we wanted it.  After following a few promising leads, we found it.

Literally.  You have no idea – this tree was actually honestly in a moonbeam.  We turned around a small copse of trees, and saw this single tree in a literal moonbeam, just waiting for us.  We both gasped, looked at each other, and hefted our tools.

Before long, the tree was in the box on the roof, and we were driving home.  We ordered two pizzas on the way, picking them up as we drove.

We then each ate an entire pizza.

Because we’re adults, and can do what we want.

Especially after hiking up and down a mountain, and finding a perfect Christmas tree.

Backpacking up Broken Top

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10-Oct, 11-Oct-2015

Saturday, 10-October-2015

As we drove down the highway toward the trailhead, it was foggy.  Or… I think it was foggy.  It may have been raining, or it may have been a cloud (which is technically the same as fog but hush).  Either way, it was a bit worrying, and Dave, Sarah and I started talking about weather and concerns.

But that quitter talk didn’t last long.  It was lightly drizzling when we put our packs on our backs, and the rain stayed with us while we walked past the trail marker and across the wooden bridge onto the main trail.

We had rain gear.  We had good camping gear, food, and energy.  And we’d already bailed off one hike due to rain (Ed Note: see weekend of ____), so we weren’t going to give up without a fight this time.

The rain kept at the pace of a light drizzle for the whole hike, right up until when we got to the main campsite where we’d be setting our basecamp for the summit bid.

Then, it started pouring.  Seriously – the campsite itself seemed to be a locus of power for the storm, and it was just hanging over the whole area.  Sarah had started burning out on the hike in, thanks to me infecting her with the plague, and none of us were feeling particularly dry… so we made moves to find the closest, most tree-covered campsite that we could.

And we found one, after a good while of searching and finding campsite after campsite occupied.  Even found one group with a nice cheery fire going… blatantly against the “dear lord no outdoor fires, Oregon is a damn tinderbox!” rules.  Though seeing as it was pouring rain out, I can’t really see a wildfire starting.  You know, if we’re being honest.  Since this is, in fact, my blog.

We did find a campsite finally, though.  And it was basically ideal – under some heavy trees, but not the kind of tree that we’d be worried would come crashing down on our heads over night.  It was almost a little fort; a bare campsite in the middle of a stand of connifers.

So camp got set up.  Snacks were had.  We pulled off rain layers, warmed up in new dry layers, and slowly got camp set up… as much as we could, thanks to the ever worsening storm.

Most of our gear was soaked through by this point – which would turn into a much bigger issue as the night went on.  While setting up camp though, the main issue was my rain jacket… over time my Cloudsplitter (Ed note: See Ben’s fancy gear review on the Cloudsplitter… and maybe somehow get EMS to sponsor him?) had become less waterproof… it wasn’t quick to soak through, mind you.  It had kept me dry for almost the whole hike, and was still keeping me very warm even when wet.

Four hours in the rain had been enough though, and my poor jacket was saturated.  Thankfully I’d put my pack cover on while we were still at the car, so almost everything else was dry… and let me tell you; dry sleeping bags and pads and socks are basically the greatest thing ever.

So Sarah and I all stuffed ourselves into the two-person tent that she’d brought while Dave set up his bivy sack, and we started heating up a bit of mountain house, along with our random snacks that hadn’t gotten eaten on the trail, as a nice little dinner.  Dave joined us in the tent, then we all spent most of the evening playing a little dice-based hiking game that my folks had bought me a few years back, as a random Hannukah present.  It was fun!

Then sleep – which became a bit more of an issue than we’d expected, when Dave went outside to find that his bivy sack had soaked through, and was completely unsuitable for sleeping in.

And it was getting a bit cold out… we were looking at 34 degree rain, from what Sarah’s mountaineering watch was telling us.

And that, kids, is exactly the kind of weather where people go hypothermic.

But remember – we’re all good at what we do.  While Dave and Sarah are undoubtedly more experienced mountaineers than I, my experience in the back country isn’t anything to sneeze at either.  So we took a few simple, yet super important, precautions…

  • We organized where we slept.
    Dave and Sarah both had extremely nice mountaineering sleeping bags – down-filled, which make them very warm and very light.  However!  Down looses most of its insulating ability when wet; their bags were water resistant, but that would never stand up to the rain we were dealing with.
    I, on the other hand, had a heavier sleeping bag made of synthetic fibers.  Just as warm, but over twice as heavy… But with the bonus that synthetics stay quite warm even when soaked.
    So, making use of this, I took the wet side of the tent.  It wasn’t leaking, per se, but the wind had been whipping rain up under the rainfly on one side.  So we positioned my sleeping bag (and myself) as a shield to catch any rain coming in.
  • We layered sleeping pads.
    Dave’s pad had been soaked through, which meant that anyone sleeping on it would effectively be sleeping in water… So we layered it below Sarah’s and my pads, minimizing the surface that anyone would be in contact with it.
    To further protect ourselves, we also layered my emergency bivy sack (basically a rolled up heat blanket) on top of the sleeping pads, to make sure that any water that leaked under the pads would be kept away from us as we slept.
  • We had plans.
    Always be ready for a worst-case… and camping is no exception.  We had some spare body warmers stashed, along with two full meals and a full fuel tank for my little Jetboil stove.  Everyone knew to keep a wary eye on their body temperature – if anyone started shivering during the night, the plan was to wake up, and heat themselves a warm meal to bring the temperature back to where it should be.
    As an absolute backup, we kept most of our gear safely packed up and ready to go.  That way, if it came to it, we could quickly and easily pack up camp and head back to the car if the weather took a major turn for the worst.

Sunday, 11-October-2015

By the time we all woke up and detangled the mess of having three people stuffed into a two person tent, the rain had stopped and the sun had started to peek out from the clouds.

The night hadn’t been bad – my only annoyance had been the baguette that we’d put in a side pocket had been smacking me in the face all night as the wind pushed the tent walls around.  I’d stayed warm, partially due to the sleeping bag, partially due to three people’s worth of body heat, but mostly due to Sarah basically perching herself (and her sleeping bag) on top of me to make room for everyone in the tent.

And when I looked around, once we’d all extricated ourselves?

The views are a major reason why I love the Pacific Northwest so much.  When I did a 360 degree turn outside the campsite, I saw some of the best views yet.  The rain had turned to snow halfway up the peaks surrounding us, covering Broken Top and the Three Sisters in a blanket of white.  It was gorgeous.

Of course, the snow and ice on the trail that we had planned on taking ruined our plans.  We had good gear, but hadn’t packed equipment for ice travel… and the steepness of the slopes I was looking at made it abundantly clear that ice equipment would be 100% necessary where we were going.

So instead, we put all our gear out in the sun to dry, and took a short walk around the lakes that we’d camped by.

We walked, explored, and nearly got jumped by a dog that was a little too zealous with guarding its owners campsite (which was maybe 1/4 mile away… keep your dogs under control, people).  We met more than a few groups of people, but overall the vibe in the area was quiet and relaxed, a nice post-storm feeling.

Then we packed our assorted (some of it even dry!) gear into our packs, and descended back toward the car and civilization.  We did take one nice stop to explore an obsidian moraine (a huge wall of obsidian rock, pushed down the slope by a glacier eons ago), which was pretty amazing.  I found what I’m pretty sure is the entrance to a boss dungeon… a huge spire of dark black stone.  I didn’t know the correct incantation though, so no sweet boss-loot for me, I’m afraid.

Then we just trucked – hiked back with nary a rest to be had.  Packed the car, and headed into Bend for coffee and nachos.

Because after bailing off an ascent, again, is depressing.  And the cure for that is nachos.